RSS

Tag Archives: planting onion

Terrace Plant Thursday – Issue 4

Terrace Plant Thursday – Issue 4

Last week we looked at growing an onion in a two litre coke bottle.

Exactly one week after planting the onion, I took a photo of it’s progress. I continued to take a photo each week to show the progress. Be aware, though, that there was a lot of growth and it had to be trimmed many times. We actually used the onion leaves as a herb in cooking.

Unfortunately I discovered a downside to Terrace Plants… bugs. I’m working on trying to find a solution, but our kitchen got infested with tiny bugs and I had to get rid of the (egg infested) plant. However it did give me an opportunity to see how much it had grown over a month or so.

One week after being potted:

IMG_1274

 

Two weeks after being potted :

IMG_1430

Three weeks after potting :

IMG_1543

Four weeks after potting – the end…

IMG_1784

 

Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 22, 2013 in Terrace Plant Thursday

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Terrace Plant Thursday – Issue 3

Terrace Plant Thursday – Issue 3

 

 

 

I once read somewhere that you can cut the bottom off an onion and grow a new one. I thought I’d give it a go.

I found an onion that had started to sprout a few roots in the fridge and cut the bottom off it. I then suspended the onion bottom with toothpicks over a glass of water. I topped the water up as needed and left it in there until there was a decent amount of green growth. You can see below when I thought it might be time to repot it.

IMG_1216

IMG_1217

 

Since I don’t have a garden, I decided to use an empty two litre soft drink bottle as the pot for the onion. I can keep it on my window sill and see how it grows.

 

 

IMG_1218

I removed the label and cut the top part off, giving me heaps of room to pot the plant.

IMG_1219

The next step was to drill holes in the bottom to give the soil drainage. Pooling water will rot the roots!

IMG_1220

To further help with drainage, I filled the very bottom with small rocks. This will ensure that the water happily flows through and out of the holes.

IMG_1222

Once the drainage is established, the next step is to put the soil in. I just used potting mix, but you can also use the soil I have spoken about previously on my blog. I also threw in some slow release fertiliser to feed the plant.

IMG_1224

The slow release stuff works best right at the roots, so it’s good to put some extra soil in on top of it. Make it into a kind of funnel so that you can just pop the plant in and add more soil.

IMG_1226

Here’s the “funnel” being filled by the plant. Try to get all the roots to go in to the middle of the dirt and then you can add more dirt around it…

IMG_1227

IMG_1229

 

IMG_1230

 

IMG_1231

Once you’ve filled the container up with soil and there is a little poking out the top to encourage growth, it’s time to water the plant. Since it can be a little traumatic for the plant to be repotted, it’s a good idea to water the plant gently. Do this by placing it into the sink with a plug in and slowly filling the sink with water until it’s at the same level as the dirt. This will allow the water to soak through and water the plant without displacing the roots.

IMG_1232

Then remove the plant from the water, allow it to drain and then place it on the window sill and watch it grow! I’ll revisit the progress of the plant next week.

IMG_1233

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 15, 2013 in Terrace Plant Thursday

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: